Gnothautii Cornerstone

Gnothautii cornerstone

The third and final cornerstone-laying was for the Gnothautii cornerstone. Check out the first and second ones. Sounds like it wasn’t quite as cool as the Adelphi ceremony.

Members and friends of Gnothautii got together on a Wednesday morning to lay the mottled red granite stone, which bears a simple inscription: “Gnothautii. Founded 1848.” They filled an empty space within the stone — what we’d now call a time capsule — with several items. Among them: an account of Gnothautii’s founding, its constitution and by-laws, a list of members from the founding, a list of present officers, and newspapers.

The cornerstone was laid by Knox Professor Milton Comstock, an 1851 Knox grad and one of Gnothautii’s original founders. He taught mathematics, philosophy, and astronomy, and he also was a noted horticulturalist. Comstock was part of “The Great Triumvirate,” a name given to three distinguished scholars (Comstock, Albert Hurd, and George Churchill) who formed the core of the Knox faculty in the second half of the 19th century.

Comstock delivered remarks, and he was followed by J. A. McKenzie, a Gnothautii and a lawyer in Knox County. McKenzie made his speech without using notes.

Here’s a photo of “The Great Triumvirate.”

The Great Triumvirate of Knox College in the late 1800s.

Milton Comstock, left, Albert Hurd, right, and George Churchill were The Great Triumvirate of Knox College in the late 1800s.

Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed