Scrabble Night Fundraiser, Sept. 28

Altrusa Club of Galesburg is hosting a “Scrabble Night” on Friday, September 28, at the American Legion, doors open at 6:30 p.m. Play begins at 7 p.m. The format is more like rounds of word games than traditional Scrabble. It moves along quickly and is quite fun!

The evening includes snacks and a cash bar, and is for a good cause. The work of Altrusa supports literacy and education in the Galesburg area. More specifically, Altrusa funds support a scholarship for a non-traditional student from Knox county. If you are interested in organizing a “Knox” table, contact Carol Brown, Ext. 7980. Tickets are $20 each or $100 for a table of 6.

Community Chorus Welcomes all Singers

The Galesburg Communnity Chorus welcomes all faculty, staff, and students to join for the 2012-13 season. The group will perform Orff’s Carmina Burana on November 17, hold a Sing-Along Messiah on December 8, and will combine with the Knox College Choir and Monmouth College Chorale for a performance of Haydn’s Lord Nelson Mass on April 20. There is also an opportunity to travel to New York in March with the two college choirs and perfom the Haydn in Carnegie Hall. Rehearsals are 7-9 p.m. on Mondays in Jay Rehearsal Hall in CFA. For more information contact Tim Pahel attpahel@monm.edu.

Screening and Discussion of the film “Spring 1941” by Motti Lerner, Sept. 19

Wednesday, Sept. 19
7:00 PM
Round Room, Ford Center for the Fine Arts
Screening and Discussion of the film “Spring 1941,” by script writer and Glossberg Visiting Israeli Scholar Motti Lerner
The story of the film Spring 1941 takes place during the Second World War in Poland. Shot on location in Lodz, Lublin and Sanok, this first ever Israeli-Polish coproduction tells he of an impossible love triangle erupting when a Jewish couple escapes the terrors of the war to the farm of a local Polish woman. Starring Joseph Fiennes (Shakespeare in Love), Clare Higgins (The Golden Campus), Kelly Harrison and Neve McIntosh. Directed by Oscar Nominee Uri Barbash and written by Motti Lerner. The script is inspired by a story of famed author Ida Fink. (122 minutes, English). Motti Lerner will introduce the film, and a discussion with Lerner will follow the showing. Lerner is an award-winning playwright and screenwriter, whose work for the stage has been produced in many countries including the USA, Germany, and South Africa. This is the third time Lerner has visited Knox.

EquiKnox Lecture “Global Energy and Sustainability” by Scott L. Montgomery ’73

Tuesday, Sept. 18
7:00 p.m.
Harbach Theatre in the Ford Center for Fine Arts

Scott L Montgomery ’73 is an author, geologist, and affiliate faculty member at the University of Washington, Seattle. He has over 25 years experience in the energy industry and is well-known for his many technical papers, reports, monographs, and his most recent book, Powers that Be: Global Energy for the 21st Century and Beyond, which deals directly with the realities of our current energy system, climate change, and concepts of sustainability.
In addition, he has diverse interests that cross the boundaries between science and the humanities, having authored other books and many essays on a range of topics in the history of science, language studies, education, translation, and cultural history. His publications on these subjects have appeared in many journals, including, Science and Nature.

His teaching reflects his research pursuits, including undergraduate courses on energy, sustainability, and geopolitics; climate change; English as a global language; art and science. He has a B.A. in English from Knox College and an M.S. in geological sciences from Cornell University.
*This event is part of CommUNITY Week 2012.

Neo-Assyrian Palaces: Power, Prestige and Propaganda (Archaeology Lecture), Sept. 17

Monday, Sept. 17, 7:30 PM
Lincoln Room, Seymour Union
In the first millennium BCE the ancient Assyrians built great palaces in what is now Iraq to serve not just as homes for their kings, but gathering places for their armies and store houses for their tribute. They also used the art in their palaces to send messages of power and prestige to the peoples of their empire and beyond. The images were carved onto large scale wall reliefs which were beautiful, yet also intended to educate the viewer on the dangers of failing to obey the king’s authority. The earliest palaces bore images of the king as warrior, religious leader and mighty hunter, while later palaces were adorned with scenes of loyal subjects paying tribute, and disloyal ones paying the consequences. Friend and foe would have been paraded past these illustrations on their way to see the king. This illustrated lecture presents the wonders of these ancient monuments, the great variety and detail of their decoration, and their use as political propaganda by the Assyrians.
Dr. Barron, a member of the Near Eastern Studies Department of the University of Toronto, is an authority on the ancient Near East and its empires, with a special focus on the art and architecture of the Neo-Assyrians. Join us for two lectures by Dr. Barron — Monday night at Knox College and Tuesday night at Monmouth College, where she’ll lecture about Agatha Christie and her archaeologist husband.

Invitation to TKS Forums

From Anna Meier:
I’m the 2012-2013 editor-in-chief of The Knox Student. I’m writing to invite you to two open forums that senior TKS editors will be holding especially for faculty and staff on Thursday, Sept. 20 at 4:30 p.m. and Friday, Sept. 21 at 4 p.m. in Ferris Lounge. This year, we want to do a better job of connecting with our readership, and we want to speak to you directly, hear your concerns, and let you know how we’ve already taken steps to address some of them. On a lighter note, we also want to make you aware of how you can use TKS as a venue for publicity for your and your students’ work and events.

These forums are strictly for Knox faculty and staff, and the information presented at both will be identical, so you only need to come to one. I hope to see many of you there. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email me at ameier@knox.edu.

Simpson Writings Published

Chad Simpson’s essay, “An Epilogue to the Unread,” appeared recently at the Rumpus.
Simpson’s story, “Status Updates” was recently published in B O D Y. http://bodyliterature.com/2012/09/05/chad-simpson/
Simpson’s wife, Jane Carlson, created a book trailer for his soon-to-be-released collection of stories, Tell Everyone I Said Hi.
And speaking of the book: There will be a book-release party on Saturday, October 6 at Market Alley Wines in Monmouth. Simpson would be truly happy to see people from the Knox community there.

String Ensemble Opportunity

The Knox College String Ensemble offers opportunity for all string players. There is no audition. Rehearsals take place once a week on Tuesdays at 4:15 in Kresge Recital Hall. Rehearsals begin on Tuesday, Sept. 18. The String Ensemble is directed by Carolyn Suda, principal cello of the Knox-Galesburg Symphony.

The Knox-Galesburg Symphony is a professional orchestra co-sponsored by Knox College and the Galesburg Symphony Society that is open to all students by audition. Contact Mr. Polay (bpolay@knox.edu) for details.

Neo-Assyrian Palaces: Power, Prestige and Propaganda (Archaeology Lecture), Sept. 17

Monday, September 17
7:30 PM
Lincoln Room, Seymour Union
In the first millennium BCE the ancient Assyrians built great palaces in what is now Iraq to serve not just as homes for their kings, but gathering places for their armies and store houses for their tribute. They also used the art in their palaces to send messages of power and prestige to the peoples of their empire and beyond. The images were carved onto large scale wall reliefs which were beautiful, yet also intended to educate the viewer on the dangers of failing to obey the king’s authority. The earliest palaces bore images of the king as warrior, religious leader and mighty hunter, while later palaces were adorned with scenes of loyal subjects paying tribute, and disloyal ones paying the consequences. Friend and foe would have been paraded past these illustrations on their way to see the king. This illustrated lecture presents the wonders of these ancient monuments, the great variety and detail of their decoration, and their use as political propaganda by the Assyrians.
Dr. Barron, a member of the Near Eastern Studies Department of the University of Toronto, is an authority on the ancient Near East and its empires, with a special focus on the art and architecture of the Neo-Assyrians. Join us for two lectures by Dr. Barron — Monday night at Knox College and Tuesday night at Monmouth College, where she’ll lecture about Agatha Christie and her archaeologist husband.

Constitution Day Voter Registration Drive, Sept. 17

Constitution Day Voter Registration Drive
Monday, September 17
11:00 AM
Gallery, Seymour Union
It’s election season. Make sure your vote counts! Register to vote in Galesburg, or find out how to get an absentee ballot for your home. If you are eligible to vote in the U.S., then make sure you’ve registered. Galesburg closes registration 27 days before an election.
Celebrate Constitution Day by making sure you’re prepared to vote.
To register to vote you must be:
• A citizen of the United States.
• 18 years of age or older by the date of the election.
• A resident of your precinct for 30 days by the date of the election.
Students who are 17, but will be 18 on or before the election, must register to vote before the close of registration, even if not 18 before the close of registration, to vote in the upcoming election at the polls. The voter ID card will be held until your birthday. It is not necessary to have your voter’s ID card to vote.