Conner Awarded Post-Doc Position

Visiting Assistant Professor Christopher T. Conner has been awarded a summer post-doc position with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Washington DC. Under the direction of Kristen S. Miller, he will be working on expanding current methodological strategies used by the agency. Chris is thankful for his time here at Knox, the kindness shown to him by the faculty and administration, and his renewed sense of self.

Conner Receives Award

Christopher T. Conner, Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology-Sociology, is the recipient of the contingent faculty award from the Midwest Sociological Society. This award is given to faculty who have made a contribution to the annual meeting. He is organizing three sessions, and serves on the research grants committee.

Conner Guest Editor

Christopher T. Conner, Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology-Sociology , and Andrea Dassopolous (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) have been asked to guest edit a special edition of Studies in Symbolic Interaction, a research annual. Due out next year, this special edition of the journal will explore contemporary developments on the topic of subcultures (broadly defined).

The journal’s editor, Norman K. Denzin, is professor emeritus at University of Illinois-Champagn Urbana. You can find out more about the journal by visiting https://www.emeraldinsight.com/series/ssi.

Kasser Published in Journal

Tim Kasser, Professor of Psychology, had a paper published in the journal Frontiers:  Personality and Social Psychology.  The paper “Strangers in a strange land:  Relations between perceptions of others’ values and both civic engagement and cultural estrangement.”  Kasser’s co-authors include Mike Prentice, ’08, as well as colleagues from the Common Cause Foundation, Cardiff University, and the University of Bath.  

2019 Physics Prize Problem

The 2019 Physics Prize Problem is out!  The Physics Prize Problem is funded by Carroll Porter, ’32 and in memory of Edgar L Andreas ’69, and is awarded annually for the best solution to a complex physical problem.  This year’s mind-boggling physics problem concerns the oscillations of a teeter-totter. 

Check out a detailed statement of the problem, posted around SMC or available at http://course.knox.edu/physics130.  Any Knox student may submit a solution.  Turn in your solution to Prof. Tom Moses, D116 SMC, by 4 p.m. on April 29 and win a place in Knox history (and a cash prize).